First Look – HiFadility Releases Another Edit From The Queens: SWV – “Weak”

HiFadility has released another Track from his Queens EP, an edit of SWV’s Weak, which follows his remix of Queen Latifah’s U.N.I.T.Y.  Looking to commemorate the voice of woman of color in popular culture and bridge generations by bringing back old 90s favorites with new sounds, The Queens has been a very exciting project thus far, and we can’t wait until we get to hear it in full.

At first, this track has a very hard exterior, with lead singer Coko’s strong voice and a shell of synthesizer sounds, but it is worth the listen as it breaks way into smooth droplet sounds and wonderful warm and floaty piano chords that ushers in the trap high hats. The high hats creates another genre flip in the track, creating a hard hitting booty bouncing feel.  Perhaps the hard sonic exterior of this track that gives way to the warm melty sound is a metaphor for the overwhelming force of love that gives way into an appreciation HiFadility mentioned in his statement that he released with the track.  HiFadility definitely gave a new meaning to the New Jack Swing genre, a very contemporary blend of hip hop/trap and R&B.

The composer stated when he released the track:

SWV’s classic single WEAK was begging to be remade. The message of: Love being a force that sometimes knocks us out…not because of spite or anger, but sometimes because of the overwhelming sensation of a bond. I’ve been feeling like that lately. Super emotional about the world and all the things happening…this was my way of saying sorry for the griminess and yet thank you so much for accepting my growth and development. To Peace. To Love. To Prosperity for All.

-HiFadility

Be sure to check out this track on HiFadility’s soundcloud, and follow him on his social media (facebook, twitter, tumblr) for more updates regarding new music releases or his events in Boston and NYC.

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Grammy First, College Later (or Never)

Take a look at the Billboard Hot 100 today, March 9th. You’ll end up noticing all of the typical names. From Rihanna to Bruno Mars, it’s not a surprising list. One particular song, “Started From The Bottom” by Drake, has gained a lot of popularity and now sits at #6. In his music video, Drake does a satire on his own lyrics (watch the video above), which makes sense when you think about it. Come on, we all know you didn’t really start from the bottom, Jimmy.

Like every famous artist, Drake ‘hustled’ his way to the top. But he also didn’t graduate from college.

As college students, we have to wonder how much of a return we are getting on our 6-figure “investment.” Artists who show real talent are sometimes faced with a choice of getting an education, or chasing their dreams. Which is more important? Better yet, why do they have to choose? Don’t we go to college so we can chase our dreams, or does the institution hinder us from doing so? Most students wind up postponing their dreams in favor of high-paying jobs. And sometimes, those dreams never become fulfilled.

Take a look again at the Hot 100 (the first 10 songs). #3 – #10: none of these artists graduated from college. Just last year, Drake graduated from high school. #1 and #2: Macklemore and Baauer sit at the top…two relatively new names on the charts, with viral singles. Will they last? Only time will tell. Either way, 80% of the artists on the top 10 did not attend college. These 80% have multiple platinum albums and multiple Grammys to show for it. These 80% have decided to postpone higher education for success.*

So the question is: Where does college fit in for musicians? Is there a correlation between success in this music industry and lack of a college education?
Or is it just pure luck? Seriously, we all know a college dropout who is struggling to make it in the business. Either way, the stats are a little daunting for college musicians lying in a pool of debt.

*Will.i.am. will be attending college this year to study computer science

BHM Fashion Meets Music

It’s always fun when different forms of art combine to create a production. Last weekend, during the Black History Month fashion show, fashion met music (or did music meet fashion?). The show, headed up by Columbia senior Jasmine Sudarkasa included a lot of artistic elements, from a dramatized pillow fight, to a rendition of the Harlem Shake, and a remake of “GIRLS” (video above). One of my favorite parts though, was what occurred in between the different designers: a jazz band called “Steven Fowler.” The band had a Robert Glasper feel to it, as they began with a basic melody/theme and expanded upon it in each instrument. Each member had his own solo, incorporating the normal jazz elements of syncopation and harmonic dissonance. I didn’t catch the solos on video, although I wish I had. In the end though, the horns blended together to create a smooth sound as the bass line in the guitar carried the band forward. Overall, it was a great show, and it’s always wonderful to discover new bands.